Mov 5 The Geography of Dreams: “Amidst The City’s Desolation The Anima Appears As A Woman Clothed In Radiant White”

A word of explanation about the title, The Geography of Dreams. Some folks have recurring dreams. I don’t, but all of my numinous dreams take place in the same geographical location. It’s a city on a peninsula beside a sea, similar to San Francisco or St. Petersburg where I now live; however, it’s definitely in Europe — feels as if it might be Spain — and in a far different time…whether in the distant past or distant future, perhaps another dimension, I can’t tell.

The different movements of The Geography of Dreams are programmatic pieces based on actual numinous dreams I had that take place in the city by the sea.

So, while I’m dealing with this insomnia, I’m creating score videos of the different movements. Not doing them in order of performance, but rather just as the spirit moves me.

Fantasy for Harp and Chamber Orchestra (score video)

In the midst of moving so almost everything I own — except a handful of clothes, the coffee maker, and my laptop — is in boxes! I’m having insomnia so in the wee hours I’m returning to make videos of scores playing along with their tracks as a way to stay somewhat sane.

The Turtle Dove

Reposting some hymn tune arrangements in honor of the Lenten season. Streaming links at hiltonkeanjones.hearnow.com/simple-hymns. MP3 downloads and CDs available at hiltonjones.bandcamp.com/music. FREE CDs available at Lakewood UCC church service.

Sunday Morning Music: Wendeyaho

This is based on a Native American hymn traditionally sung to the four directions in the morning by the women of the community. The harmonization, arrangement, and orchestrations are my own, as well as the video performance. I’ve done several settings–orchestra, solo piano, and choir–the piano solo (with some soft string pads) is presented here.

“Wendeyaho” is often described as a “Cherokee Morning Song.” However discussion of it on the Internet indicates that the word, “Wendeyaho,” is not contemporary Cherokee, although it may have its origins in an ancient form of the language. The translation I was able to piece together from various internet sources is as follows:

Translation – We n’ de ya ho
Freely translated: “A we n'” (I am),
“de” (of),
“Yauh” –the– (Great Spirit),
“Ho” (it is so).

Feel free to download the 2 page sheet music PDF from THIS LINK so you can play it at home, yourself. You need to do some tricky shifting of hands to cover all the parts in the last two variations, but it’s doable, I promise. If you don’t want to download anything, you can follow along on this graphic below.

The choir at Lakewood UCC, St. Petersburg, FL, where I’m the music director, enjoys singing my choral arrangement of Wendeyaho. It’s very simple and effective. You can see it HERE.

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